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5 HTML Tags You Might not Know

Posted by Charles | December 4, 2009 .

You are all cheering the coming HTML5 and tired of the aging HTML5. But I bet you might not know these 5 HTML tags, which can be usefully:

<acronym>

The <acronym> tag is a way to define or further explain a group of words. When you hover over text that has the <acronym> tag used, a box appears below with the text from the title tag. For example:

Flex <ACRONYM title="Rich Internet Application blog flex888.com">RIA</ACRONYM> is fun.

The above will show as: Flex RIA is fun

<ins> and <del>

I’m sure you’ve seen the result of blog posts trying to show modification history. If you’re wanting to display editing revisions with with markup, <ins> and <del> are just the ticket. Like the name implies, <ins> highlights what’s been added to the document with an underline, and <del> shows what’s been taken out with a strikethrough.

I <DEL>likes</DEL> <INS>LOVES</INS> my PSP and Kindle.

Shows: I likes LOVES my PSP and Kindle.

<fieldset>

Fieldset is a nifty little attribute that you can add to your forms to logically group form elements. Once applied the <fieldset> tag draws a box around the elements within the fieldset. Bonus points for adding a <label> tag within the fieldset to define the title of the group.

<FORM><FIELDSET> <LEGEND>Are You Smarterr?</LEGEND>
Yes <INPUT type=radio value=yes name=yes> 
No <INPUT type=radio value=no name=no> </FIELDSET>  
</FORM> 
Shows: 
Are You Smarterr?Yes No

<rel>

Rel can be an insanely useful attribute, as any HTML element can have a rel applied to it. It’s helpful for passing extra variables that aren’t otherwise specified. This is helpful when using Javascript with your HTML. The Javascript might be looking for a link with the rel attribute "clickable", and it knows to apply some Ajax and allow it to be edited inline. This is one of many techniques you can use with the rel attribute, as the possibilities are endless.

<A href="page.html" rel=clickable>This link is editable</A>

<cite>

All of us will be familiar with the <blockquote> tag, but did you know about <blockquote>’s little brother <cite>? <cite> allows you to define the text inside of the element as a reference. Typically the browser will render the text inside of the <cite> tag in italics, but this can be changed with a touch of CSS.

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3 Comments so far
  1. Blogger Den  December 5, 2009 9:12 pm

    Really cool! I actually didn’t know a lot of these tags, but HTML 5 should revolutionize the web

  2. Patrick Ma  December 6, 2009 3:15 am

    Cool stuff, but REL is a attribute, not a tag 😛

  3. Wouter Vervloet  December 6, 2009 9:57 am

    I don’t mean to be a smartass, but your examples are filled with ‘errors’.

    The acronym tag is only used when the abbreviation itself has become a word. (like: NASA or GUI). I don’t think RIA is pronounced as ‘reeya’. I think the abbr-tag is more suited for that particular example.

    If you’re gonna give an example of a fieldset, at least make sure the rest of it is equally awesome as the fieldset tag. Wrap the label and the radio-button in a label tag and properly close the input-tag… and just for accuracy: fieldset is not an attribute, it’s a tag.

    As for the rel-attribute… it’s just friggin’ awesome! –just use (double) quotes around the value (unless it’s an HTML 5 example that is…)

    I wouldn’t consider cite as blockquotes little brother, as they mean something completely different. It’s more like a cousin 😉
    Blockquote’s little brother would be the q-tag.

    Other than that, none of these tags are used nearly enough. Another one that is just as awesome and totally ignored by the masses is the definition list (dl, dt, dd) tags…

    Greetz,
    Wouter

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