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Trusting Adobe AIR Apps

Posted by Sravan | July 30, 2008 .

MeeBone, RichFLV, Snackr, Twhirl, Wallowr. I can think of three things common to these RIAs. All five of them are Adobe AIR apps, with an UNKNOWN publisher, reviewed on our Flex RIA.

Users are aware that anything they install from the web could be unreliable. Shipping your Adobe AIR apps (for that matter, any apps) after digitally signing them is a good way to instill customer confidence, especially because most apps need unrestricted system access. (You will also get an extra thumbs up from reviewers for not playing with their blood pressures.)

Security certificates can be obtained from any trusted third-party vendor (like VeriSign) called a Certificate Authority. Understandably, these aren’t freebies and so beginners may at least sign the application with an untrusted certificate as an UNVERIFIED publisher to allow the installation process. Signing in the first place is an initiative towards trust, and your official website can reinforce it.

This Adobe AIR article gives a detailed how-to for digitally signing Adobe AIR applications with an example called “test” that uses Thawte. The writer goes on to suggest getting your security certificate from Thawte though any “class-3, high-assurance certificate” should suffice. Thawte offers certificates starting at $300 per year.

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2 Comments so far
  1. Stefan@JustRIA  July 30, 2008 4:39 pm

    Free coder-signing certificates are available from cacert.org, although their root certificate is currently no included in any browser.

    The more people user CACert’s certificates, the more likely browser / operating-system providers will include their root certificates.

    Link:
    https://www.cacert.org/
    https://www.cacert.org/index.php?id=1

  2. Sravan  August 23, 2008 9:01 am

    Thank you for the link, Stefan. CACert looks good, suitable for independent developers making small apps.

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